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Seattle International Randonneurs

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Seattle International Randonneurs
 

Welcome to Randonneuring!

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Randonneuring is long-distance unsupported endurance cycling. This style of riding is non-competitive in nature, and self-sufficiency is paramount. Participation in randonneuring events is part of a long tradition that goes back to the beginning of the sport of cycling in France and Italy. Friendly camaraderie and perseverance are the hallmarks of randonneuring.

 

Summer 600K Brevet (ACP) 8/26/2017

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Summer 600K Brevet (ACP) Total elevation over the two days is ~ 15, 000 ft; less ft/mi than PBP, but not a walk in the park, either.

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Come ride with SIR!

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Randonneuring is self-supported long-distance cycling. It's a great sport for those who love to ride their bikes, like to explore new roads, and wonder what is over the next hill. Our rides are scenic and challenging.  Perhaps most enjoyable is the camaraderie among randonneurs. Randonneuring is not a race,  but the time limits makes it challenging nonetheless.

Randonneuring is a big tent where every rider finds his or her challenge. Some aspire to finish within the time limit, others try to set a personal best, yet others want to go as fast as possible. Some concentrate on the longest distances, others do the day rides (100, 200 and 300 km). All are randonneurs. At Seattle International Randonneurs, each rider is respected. We are all out to have fun.

Rides (called Populaires or Brevets) vary in length between 100 km (62 miles) and 1200 km (750 miles). Riders are given a route sheet, which tells them where to go. They carry a control card, which they have signed at pre-determined points to show that they have completed the course. At the end, those who complete the course within the time limits obtain a medal.

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Summer 1000K Brevet (ACP)

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Crowsnest 1000K Brevet (ACP)

The Crowsnest 1000 km is not your ordinary 1000 km. It will climb over many mountain ranges in Washington, British Columbia, Idaho and Montana. This route includes mountainous highways through British Columbia as an alternate way to Whitefish, instead of riding the traditional Seattle or Portland Glacier 1000 km routes. After comparing the elevation profiles, Crowsnest route is obviously quite the contrast to the original, with many beautiful views of the Cascades, Okanagan Highlands, the Manashees Range and Selkirk Mountains. The route is named after the Crowsnest Highway BC-3, which is the shortest distant highway connecting the High Plains of Alberta with Hope, BC. The portion of the Crowsnest Highway this 1000 km will cross over the 5 rugged mountain passess of south central BC all on Day 2, between Osoyoos and Creston. This section will be some of the most rigorous randonneur mountain riding, but will be well supported on the climb up Kootenay Pass, on the way to Creston, BC. The entire 1000k will be very challenging with about 36,000 ft of climbing (according to Openrunner). Day 1 will follow similar passes as in Cascade 1200 course (though reversed) over Rainy, Washington and Loup Loup Passes and head north to overnight in Osoyoos, BC. After the Day 2 mountainous day on the Crowsnest, Day 3 will be much less climbing through broader valleys of Kootenay River and Fisher River and one mountain pass over the Salish Range (Happy’s Inn Summit).

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Who's Been Riding?

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